The “end” of high voltage reflector tungsten halogen lamps

09.09.2016

Application:  General lighting
Technology:  High-voltage Reflector Halogen Lamps,  LED Reflector lamps
Target Group:  Trade,  Electrician,  Installer,  Architect

Since September 2009, energy consumption-relevant light sources have been dis-appearing step-by-step from the market. This year it’s the turn of the high voltage reflector tungsten halogen lamps as best-known representatives. These are no longer permitted to be put into circulation in the European Union from 1st September 2016 as part of the third step of Directive (EU) 1194/2012.

Who is affected by the ban?
The regulation initially and mainly affects the lamp producers and dealers because the new ban on incandescent lamps applies exclusively to the initial “putting into circulation” in the common market. This means that people having affected lamps at home need not immediately replace these. However, levels of availability for the high voltage reflector tungsten halogen lamps, as with other affected lamp types, will continuously become less from 1st September 2016. The regulation will therefore become truly noticeable for consumers at the latest when all stocks are sold.

How can I identify affected lamps?
The most popular lamps affected by the directive are the high voltage reflector tungsten halogen lamps. These can be recognized by the following features:

  • Reflector lamps emit targeted light to the front in contrast to e.g. omnidirectional distribution pear-shaped lamps.
  • Most affected lamps have GU10, E27 or E14 bases.
  • The bulbs or casings of the lamps are made of glass.
  • High voltage reflector tungsten halogen lamps are used primarily in recessed luminaires, spots and track systems.
  • The affected luminaire is operated without a transformer.

Which alternatives are available?
As an alternative, LED reflector lamps can be used. With a luminous element completely of glass, as produced by LEDVANCE, these look deceptively similar to original halogen lamps and are therefore ideal direct replacements. Replacing the lamps is also highly simple: take out the conventional halogen lamp and fit the economic LED lamp – done! A tip for those who pay attention to their wallet: LED lamps are more expensive to buy than comparable halogen types but pay back thanks to their significantly lower energy costs, and they also have a fundamentally higher rated service life. Certain information must be observed only when combining LED lamps with dimmers.